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Art November, 10 2009

Curated Guest Post | RJ Rushmore of Vandalog

While many students take a gap year between high school and university, just a hand full through themselves fully into a project during that period. 18-year old RJ Rushmore is one of those that turn passion into realized action. He is founder of vandalog.com, a site dedicated to the best of British Street Art, and curator of The Thousands, an exhibition highlighting privately held examples of that same art.

Being as I was coming to London, and wanted a quick primer on the street art scene, RJ kindly offered a guide. His eye and his ability to move around and capture art on the street are equal. The result is a winning archive of images – displayed through both his blog and flickr. I’m very grateful for this introduction, and hope you’ll be as engaged as I’ve been.

All images and text from here by RJ Rushmore, beginning with a note about the above photograph.

“Bristol might be Banksy’s home, but there’s no shortage of his work in London. For the most part though, it’s been covered in plastic. I’ll let you decide if that’s a good idea or a bad one.”

Another artist who seems to be everywhere in certain parts of London is Eine. While some of his letters have been severely tagged or painted over, I'm pretty sure that a good number of shop keepers maintain theirs because the pieces are so distinctive.

While it might not happen every day, there are a surprising number of stores that enjoy having their shutters painted, so it's not uncommon to see artists or writers like Elate painting in the middle of the day without fear of arrest.

Curated Guest Post | RJ Rushmore of Vandalog

When it comes to out-of-towners, nobody has hit London harder than Space Invader. This piece is his biggest, but there is a spot nearby where you can stand and be within 500 feet of a half dozen or so Invader pieces.

But credit where credit is due, Roa recently came to town and get up more 10 days than most artists will paint in 6 months. This piece is just off of Brick Lane, the epicenter of London's street art scene.

Stik isn't the best known artist internationally, but he's a staple of the London scene, and you've got to admire this piece. The colors are perfect and it's placement on a tiny and quiet little street makes the piece a great surprise for anybody who isn't expecting it.

Another surprising find, though not quite as loud. You really have to be looking closely to spot this stencil by C215. I never would have spotted piece myself if I hadn't been specifically looking for it.

One of two street pieces by Conor Harrington left in London, I think this painting shows Conor's work at its best: huge and outdoors.

Selectism