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Photography July, 21 2011

Becoming: Photographs from the Wedge Collection

Organized by Kenneth Montague of Wedge Curatorial Projects, Toronto, Becoming: Photographs from the Wedge Collection opens at the Nasher Museum on August 11, 2011. The collected photographs, from over 40 artists, will remain on view through January 8, 2012.

This exhibition brings together approximately 60 works by more than 40 artists from Canada, the United States, Africa and throughout the African Diaspora to explore how new configurations of identity have been shaped by the photographic portrait within the last century. Whether these images document an era or reflect on family histories, this compelling exhibition provides a vivid testimony to the increasing presence of artists who chose to reject the common tendency to view black communities in terms of conflict or stereotype. Becoming offers a fresh exploration of the strength, beauty and complexity captured within representations of black life as it is both lived and imagined. Providing insights into the changing roles of the artist and subject, the camera is used to create scenes that vary from everyday realism to a staged universe. Some images have the look and feel of snapshots, while others convey a theatrical or cinematic positioning. Other works explore the conventions of the family portrait and family album within the dynamics of domestic space and implied perceptions of visuality and body politics.

Artists include Henry Clay Anderson, Dawoud Bey, Mohamed Camara, Calvin Dondo, Joy Gregory, Tony Gleaton, Rashid Johnson, Seydou Keita, Megan Morgan, Dennis Morris, J.D.’Okhai Ojiekere, Dawit Petros, Charlie Phillips, Wayne Salmon, Jamel Shabazz, Malick Sidibé, Mickalene Thomas, Hank Willis Thomas and James VanDerZee.

Organized by Kenneth Montague of Wedge Curatorial Projects, Toronto, Becoming: Photographs from the Wedge Collection opens at the Nasher Museum on August 11, 2011. The collected photographs, from over 40 artists, will remain on view through January 8, 2012.

Selections from the exhibition follow.

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