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Architecture May, 29 2014

18.36.54 Geometric House by Daniel Liebeskind

Deep in the heart of rural Connecticut is probably not the first place you’d expect to find abstract architecture, yet that’s the location of the latest project by Polish conceptual mastermind Daniel Liebeskind. The man behind such infamous buildings as Berlin’s Jewish Museum, the Denver Art Museum, and the forthcoming structure at the site of the World Trade Center has christened this building simply the ’18.36.54 House’—a subtle name for a building so striking.

The house itself was inspired by the twisting shape of a ribbon, and in typical Libeskind style it uses mind-bending geometry to create an entirely irregular space where no two walls or spaces are alike. The exterior is clad entirely in polished copper that reflects both the sun and the surrounding countryside, while inside the floors are a creamy shade of marble that sets off the majestic, angular wooden walls, units and ceiling. Sure, it might feel like you’ve slipped down the rabbit hole every time you take a walk to the bathroom, but you can bet your bottom dollar there’s not a house in the neighborhood that comes close to looking this good.

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  1. Photography: Nikolas Koenig

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