Another month, another fresh wave of upcoming talent flooding the Highsnobiety inboxes. Get familiar with a fresh batch of underground fashion brands in this month’s installment of our Under The Radar series.

The Highsnobiety inboxes are inundated on a daily basis with new brands vying for a piece of the spotlight. So, to help you show off your vast knowledge of obscure fashion labels, each month we take a moment to introduce you to a fresh batch of upcoming talent. Below you’ll find some of the best collections to land in our inbox this month, from Russian streetwear to avant-garde fashion school graduates – get to know them before they’re massive.

If your brand wants to be considered for future posts then, by all means, get in touch. Meanwhile, for more undiscovered talent, check out the rest of our Under the Radar series.

Created by a Birmingham Rastafarian named Robert Sidlauskas, Dready took the UK streetwear scene by storm in the late ’80s and ’90s with their bold graphic tees sporting the illustrator’s distinctive, hand-drawn cartoon characters. The brand returns for the Fall/Winter 2015 season with a set of garments bearing previously unseen graphics from Sidlauskas’s hand; paying tribute to Britain’s thriving Rastafarian culture in a suitably bold fashion while keeping the brand’s core message of positivity and harmony intact.

August Institute

August Institute is the brainchild of two 18-year-old Moscow youths, who create ’90s-flavored streetwear imbued with their city’s unique spirit – think throwback pieces executed with boxy cuts and retro fabrics. Gosha Rubchinskiy, always keen to champion Russian talent, shot the brand’s latest campaign. The label’s debut collections are proving highly popular with stylish Muscovites, so it looks like we’ll be hearing a lot more from this young brand in seasons to come.

HAiK

Scandinavian design collective HAiK produce men’s and women’s collections alongside video installations, sculptures and artist collaborations. The multi-disciplinary team present a Fall/Winter 2015 collection of menswear that plays heavily with proportions and patterns, as billowing trousers are paired with constricted knitwear and patchwork fabrics pieced together from various dresses. It’s not all abstract expression, though – the brand balances artistic flair with wearability, in a quintessentially Nordic manner.

Comutor

London luggage label Comutor drop a selection of nylon backpacks that, in a nod to retro down jackets, sport puffy, quilted exteriors. Offered in a variety of tonal, minimalist colorways, the label’s bags stay on the straight and narrow, pairing functionality with easy-going, low-key aesthetics; just how backpacks should be.

PLAC

Korean label PLAC originally started out as a denim brand, before expanding into a fully fledged menswear offering that pushes a simultaneously fashion-forward and accessible aesthetic. Highly wearable staples are paired with adventurous, oversized garments and executed in minimalist colorways. Think of them as Korea’s answer to Acne Studios.

Paw Hansen

Former Kim Jones designer Paw Hansen debuts his Fall/Winter 2015 collection of rugged, masculine menswear pieces. All pieces are crafted in London, as fabrics like waxy cowhide and shearling linings are utilized across timeless staples, with extra details like oversized pockets and exaggerated turtle necks adding a playful element to what is a mainly sombre aesthetic.

MEES

Dutch luggage label MEES lovingly craft each of their rucksacks by hand, expertly-sourced leather than ensures no one product is the same. Available in two sizes – large, and smaller ones for the girls – the label’s rucksacks sport hang loops, rustic belt-like fastenings and are available in a variety of finishes and textures – including pebbled, nubuck and paint-splattered leathers.

For more upcoming labels, check out the rest of our Under The Radar series.

Words by Alec Leach
Digital Fashion Editor

Alec Leach grew up in Brighton, England, but now lives in Berlin, where he leads Highsnobiety's digital fashion content.

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