Highsnobiety / Jacob Breinholt

Beyond the Streets, a traveling collection of art directed and curated by Roger Gastman, bills itself as “the premier exhibition of graffiti, street art, and beyond.” And the current iteration has just opened its doors in one of Williamsburg’s freshest new spaces, 25 Kent.

In addition to hosting works by some of the world’s premier contemporary artists, the exhibition is set against a backdrop of stunning panoramic views of the Manhattan skyline. The venue is also tucked among several “native” instances of street art by some of the exhibited artists, including KATSU, REVOK, and Craig Costello.

We headed to Brooklyn to check out Beyond the Streets and see work by some of the best contemporary and street artists in the world today. Below are a few of our favorite exhibits from the show, including Takashi Murakami, Futura, and skate culture legend C.R. Stecyk III.

Takashi Murakami

Murakami’s standout work at the event is a large-scale sculpture of the word “Hollow,” done in the artist’s signature palette of bright colors and covered in smaller messages in various hand styles. The piece is flanked by equally colorful murals that run the length of the space.

Bill Barminski

The Barminski exhibit is a complete replica of a studio apartment, replete with full-scale furniture, wall art, sneakers, and bottles of “HYPE.” The level of detail is equal parts amusing and aesthetically pleasing. We particularly loved the wall-mounted skate decks and collection of Krylon spray paint cans.

Cleon Peterson

Peterson’s exhibit featured a sculpture of a lifesize military figure on horseback finished in a bright red glossy resin. Surrounding the sculpture are a handful of large panels painted in Peterson’s signature red and black color scheme, depicting various politically themed images.

C.R. Stecyk III

This installation includes a wall of colorful pieces, but our favorite part is a sculpture made from rusted-out spray cans arranged on a matching industrial shopping cart. The colorful spray caps juxtaposed against corroded metal make it an eye-catching ensemble.

FAILE

Brooklyn-based duo FAILE’s exhibit includes two large wooden panels covered on both sides with the artists’ patented collages of detailed illustrations, interspersed with text. The installation also includes a variety of the duo’s totems, which historically could be found installed around Brooklyn.

Barry McGee

Highsnobiety / Jacob Breinholt

For this year’s exhibition, McGee transformed the exhibition space into an art store. Looking through the window, you’ll see a large wall adorned with the artist’s work, some framed, some painted directly onto the wall, with everything tucked behind a countertop styled to look like it’s from a previous era.

Futura

Native New Yorker Futura’s installation gets the Manhattan skyline as its backdrop, featuring a lifesize white resin sculpture of one of the artist’s signature aliens bedecked in geometric facets. The main piece is flanked by four panels painted in a way that almost resembles tie-dye, accented by negative stencils of power saw blades.

Jose Parla

The Parla installation contains a mix of sculpture and paintings. The space features a handful of giant slabs adorned with paint and textural elements. Two adjacent large-format paintings are done in a similar style and palette.

Kenny Scharf

Highsnobiety / Jacob Breinholt

Scharf’s installation features a billboard-sized triptych mural around a rotating sculpture of stacked characters. The pieces are done in Scharf’s signature bright primary colors.

RISK

Recalling Damien Hirst’s shark in formaldehyde, RISK’s contribution is a lifesize sculpture of a shark suspended in a metal frame. The shark is made from small pieces of scrap metal welded together, with a pair of combination locks for eyes.

Beyond the Streets
25 Kent Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11249

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