Chances are that you've heard the phrase in passing over the past year; "if Donald Trump is elected President of the United States, I'm moving to Canada." Not only does it reflect a distaste for the Republican nominee, but it also severely devalues our partners to the North by insinuating that only a racist blowhard would make one consider emigrating to Canada.

Logistically speaking, uprooting your life in the United States for a four-year hiatus in Canada isn't nearly as easy as a person thinks - despite pledges to go elsewhere from people ranging from Miley Cyrus to Jon Stewart in the months after Donald Trump solidified a nomination for the highest office in the land.

In fact, it might already be too late for all of us.

As the above Google Trends data suggests, "move to Canada" search volume in March of this year was the highest it had been since 2004 when George W. Bush had won reelection and millions considered a geographical move not unlike what people are facing today due to the political climate in the country.

Let's assume that two things are an actual possibility.

One, that Donald Trump has a chance to win the election. As of October 25, FiveThirtyEight gave him precisely a 14.1 percent chance of succeeding President Obama.

Secondly, let's consider that if Donald Trump does win, some people will indeed follow through on their pledges to move abroad. According to at least one poll, 28 percent of Americans have at least considered leaving the United States for good "for a country such as Canada” if Trump is elected. Should this be the case, those people need to understand how policy works and what particular countries are more accepting of expatriates than others.

Perhaps the biggest thing that Americans need to understand is that the U.S. is one of but a handful of countries in the world to tax non-resident citizens on their worldwide income, and the only major industrialized nation to do so. Thus, you could find yourself living abroad for years and still be on the hook for paying two sets of taxes unless you renounce your American citizenship completely. But perhaps the political climate in the States is just that dire; between January and March of 2015, a record 1,336 Americans renounced their U.S. citizenship, according to a quarterly report by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that was published in The Federal Register.

But if you still think moving away is the right choice, here are four countries that could serve as potential refuge during The Donald's reign.

New Zealand

To work in New Zealand you’ll need one of the various different types of visas that are available. Working holiday visas give people from the USA between the ages of 18-30 up to 12 months in the country. An option for people older than that is a temporary work visa that lets you live and work there for a set period. Most would hope that would last at least four years.

Alternatively, if you’re considering New Zealand for the longer term you may be able to apply for a skilled migrant visa that lets you live and work there indefinitely. That entails a points system based on factors such as age, work experience, your qualifications, and an offer of skilled employment to determine eligibility. Those that qualify are also afforded the right to bring along their partner and children under one visa.

 

Panama

Panama's Boquete is one of the most world-renowned expat locales despite only inhabiting a total population of 19,000 people. Fourteen percent of its population are of foreign origin, according to La Prensa, a national newspaper.

A "pensionado visa" - which is granted to anyone who has a steady stream of at least $1,000 coming in each month - can be achieved rather easily in Panama and doesn't restrict cash flow coming from Social Security from the U.S. government or pensions. Thus, retiring abroad makes sense for people with a modest amount of savings who are looking to live on between $2,000-$5,000 USD a month, or for younger people with years of earning potential ahead who are wiling to put that on hold should Donald Trump take office.

A "friendly nations visa" can be obtained by depositing $5,000 USD into a Panamanian bank and by subsequently opening a Panama corporation which costs $650 USD. However, one can operate this "company" in name only as a means of scoring the visa.

As the above numbers would suggest, cost of living in Panama is quite low while quality of life is quite high due to the flora, fauna and oceanic proximity.

According to the cost of living website numbeo.com a three-course meal at a mid-range restaurant for two in Panama City costs around $27 USD, a local beer will run you $1 USD, and a ticket to the movies will cost you $5 USD.

Canada

Cape Breton, an island in Nova Scotia, built an entire campaign and a dedicated website, cbiftrumpwins.com, based off the fears of many Americans.

Despite our inherent beliefs that our neighbors to the North are inundated with snow year-round, Cape Breton boasts 80 degree temperatures and winters akin to the East Coast and supposedly has the most affordable housing market in North America according to their internal literature.

President Justin Trudeau cheekily responded, saying, "Cape Breton is lovely all times of year."

Canada as a whole has a rather straightforward and open immigration policy - but if you're just researching Canada as an alternative to Donald Trump, you are too late.

About 200,000 American citizens relocated to Canada in 2015 based on work permits. The three-month endeavor is the fastest way to get across the border. Specifically, the North American Free Trade Agreement points to trades like traders, investors, professionals, business visitors and intra-company transferees as professions/people suited to move to Canada.

If you don't have the privilege to waltz in due to a preexisting job that warrants entry, a person can try for "Express Entry" which lets people compete for legal permanent residency like New Zealand does with its Skilled Migrant category that ranks applicants based on education, income and work experience.

The ideal person is "someone in their 20s that's very proficient in one of Canada's official languages [English and French], and is highly educated, likely at a master's [degree] level," said Colin Singer, an immigration lawyer who is also the managing partner for the website immigration.ca, while speaking with CNN.

Sweden

According to Mashable, about 15 percent of the Swedish population are refugees and immigrants - with 36 percent of that tally being accounted for by people deemed to be from "high-income countries." In 2015 alone, Sweden grew by 103,662 people despite only boasting a population of 8,882,792. The spirit for accepting immigrants is also probably why Swedes are some of the world’s most generous people - donating about 1 percent of gross national product to humanitarian aid programs each year.

Sweden’s booming startup and technology industry means lots of foreign workers – especially in the IT field – are looking for lucrative job opportunities in the country. In 2012, roughly 20,000 work permits were granted, a peak year to date. But the influx of workers can't come fast enough for those tasked with governing the people. According to a report from the Swedish Public Employment Agency (Arbetsförmedlingen), Sweden needs a yearly addition of 64,000 immigrants aged 16-64 to compensate for the sinking number of people born in Sweden. Otherwise, there won’t be enough manpower to sustain the renowned Swedish welfare state.

"Our survey results said Sweden and New Zealand were the best ones for work-life balance," said Jacques Herman, head of international retail banking and wealth management at HSBC Bank USA. "The best work culture was in Sweden and New Zealand, as well. For job security, it was Sweden and Germany."

If you want to move to Sweden, you can start the process online. A residence permit will set you back 1,000 Swedish krona (approximately $117 USD.)

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