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Amaory B. Portorreal
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Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal
Amaory B. Portorreal

Each album in Kanye West’s discography has been reimagined as houses for an architectural illustration series by designer Amaory B. Portorreal.

Inspired by West’s YEEZY Home announcement, in which the rapper told the world his label would be branching out into architecture, including homes for low-income families, Portorreal started to imagine how West’s musical career could translate into housing.

In a statement on behalf of the designer, a spokesperson explained, “After hearing that the hip-hop artist was venturing into the world of architecture and focusing on low-income housing, [Portorreal] decided to envision what these homes could look like.”

Homes of Ye

A post shared by Amaory B. Portorreal (@_amaory) on

Each illustration’s architectural style was chosen to reflect West’s life and inspiration at the time each album was created. Therefore, as you scroll through the gallery up top, you’ll find the housing changes dramatically from image to image. With 2004’s The College Dropout, for example, the focus here is on humble beginnings, choosing  a simple style “reminiscent of the homes found in Chicago’s impoverished community.”

Skip forward a few years to West’s eight studio album, Ye, which was written and recorded at a ranch in Jackson, Wyoming, and the short, self-analyzing album has been reflected by Portorreal with a simple, secluded cabin.  His latest release, Kids See Ghosts, changes aesthetic again, this time taking shape as a Japanese courtyard home to portray Takashi Murakami‘s psychedelic album artwork.

Which Kanye West house would you like to live in? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Next, Santigold’s ‘I Don’t Want’ is a milestone in dancehall music.

Staff Writer
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