Among humanity’s greatest achievements, our shift from horse-drawn
carriages to engine-driven vehicles is one that revolutionized the
way we live.

It’s been over one hundred thirty-three years since Carl Benz
patented the first automobile in Berlin, Germany in 1886, and we’re still
feeling its effects. It struck the world like a lightning bolt, reimagining
how we travel and connect, and put what would become the Mercedes-Benz
company on the map.

There aren’t many ways to outflex the invention
of the automobile. Yet, somehow, Mercedes-Benz has made lightning strike
twice — this time almost literally. After a century of paving the way
with automobiles renowned for their quality and comfort, they’ve raced
into a new dawn in the driver’s seat of the fully electric Mercedes-Benz
EQC Edition 1886. Packing 133 years of history into the seamless, LED-outfitted chassis, the EQC 400 4MATIC Edition 1886 is a window into the past and future of cars. It’s at once both a time capsule to the birth of the automobile and a gleaming look at a future driven by EQ Electric Intelligence by Mercedes-Benz.

The EQC model is designed to make us enjoy again and find
our passion — whether it be birdwatching, beach-bumming, or something
else entirely. With tech-packed interiors and engines as quiet as a monk’s
chambers, it certainly makes the case for being an antidote to the loud
shout of the modern world. But, before we can look to the future of driving,
it’s essential we go back to the beginning and tell the story of how Carl
Benz changed the world forever.

From 1886 to the First Spark

Behind every great origin story is a dream and a path paved with
small achievements. For Carl Benz, that dream came to him in 1877 in the
form of a “vehicle without horses.”

Sparked by the thought, he toiled away for a year on a gas-driven,
two-stroke engine capable of revolutionizing transportation. It would
take months of failure and tinkering but, on New Year’s Eve in 1878, he
got his engine running for the first time — providing the fuel needed
to keep fighting for his vision.

Five years after that fateful
day, Benz launched a two-stroke “System Benz” engine fit for the market
but too big and heavy to be installed into any vehicle at the time. In
a move born out of necessity, he built an entirely new automobile fit
with a four-stroke engine. With his dream turned into a reality at last,
he braved the cold winter air and left Berlin’s German Imperial Patent
Office on 29 January 1886 with the birth certificate for a “gas-powered
vehicle” that changed the world forever.

One hundred thirty-three years after Patent Number 37435 brought
individual mobility to the auto industry, the ethos of the OG Motorwagen
has been stitched into the spirit (and seats) of the Mercedes-Benz EQC
Edition 1886. It’s a new dawn for the company and the concept of electric
mobility and, this time, we’re along for the ride.

“The ethos of the Motorwagen has been stitched into the spirit (and
seats) of the Mercedes-Benz EQC Edition 1886.”

A New Dawn for Driving

The English theologian Thomas Fuller famously said: “It is always
darkest just before the Day dawneth.” Now, finally, the new day for electric has dawned with a little help from the legendary German automaker.

It’s fitting that Mercedes-Benz’s pioneering spirit would eventually turn to electric cars. As much as we’d like to say the experience of driving electric has been as exciting as it looked in science fiction films, the reality has been more “stranded on the Autobahn with no charge.” Not exactly a cute vibe for automobiles that should be the future of driving.

Mercedes

EQC 400 4MATIC: Combined electric energy consumption: 20.8–19.7
kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions: 0 g/km.[1]

EQ and E-Mobility, Explained

The problem isn’t that electric is a snooze. Great strides
have been made to put these cars on the cutting edge of technology as
charging stations multiply like rabbits around the world. But, somewhere
along the way, they’ve lost an essential ingredient: joy. It’s a problem
that’s been at the forefront of Mercedes-Benz’s foray into electric and
now, two words are helping bring joy back to the art of the joyride in
their fully electric EQC model: Electric Intelligence.

No, not intelligence
in the sentient “talking cars in a sleepy town off Route 66” kind of way.
With the launch of the all-electric EQC as the pioneer of the future Mercedes-Benz EQ vehicle portfolio, the automaker is ushering in a new era.

EQ is an ecosystem
of services designed to bring intelligence to electromobility that goes
far beyond driving.

EQC 400 4MATIC: Combined electric energy consumption: 20.8–19.7
kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions: 0 g/km.[1]

Tech, Simplified

We live in a weird, wild world these days and if we’ve learned anything, it’s that technology should be as easy, quick, and convenient as possible.
That’s why the EQC is packed with a range of quick charging options
for home and travel; a voice-controlled AI assistant for playing your
throwback 90s rap playlist; the MBUX Augmented Reality system for navigating
with gestures like a true Jedi; and even a new feature on the ‘Mercedes me’ app to check the charge over
a morning cup of coffee (or from bed for the late-risers).

The Sound of Silence

That’s not even half of the EQC services packed into the Swiss Army Knife of electric cars. Beyond all the gizmos, gadgets, and renowned Mercedes-Benz quality, one of the standout features feels tailor-made for our weary souls: silence.

It’s a sensation that has become a precious commodity in a world that gets noisier by the day and within the EQC’s spacious cabin, there’s enough of it to fill a monastery. Like every inch of the car, the meditative calm is carefully constructed. Insulation meant to keep out the roar of the road and foam layered into the tires fights back against the sort of noise that studies have shown overwhelmingly contributes to fatigue. All that’s left is the sound of silence and the open road.

EQC 400 4MATIC: Combined electric energy consumption: 20.8–19.7
kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions: 0 g/km.[1]

The Future of Driving

Of course, the goal of the EQC wasn’t just to add “silence” to Mercedes-Benz’s reputation for security, quality, and comfort; though it does certainly help with carve out time for morning meditation on the commute. Mercedes-Benz’s vision of a new dawn goes beyond meditative cabins and an ecosystem of smart technology. It’s about turning the EQC into a worthy vessel for finding your passion — be it a walk in the woods or, perhaps, a winding drive along the cliffs to go birdwatching.

“Like every inch of the car, the meditative calm is carefully constructed.”

The Birdwatcher's Journey

EQC 400 4MATIC: Combined electric energy consumption: 20.8–19.7
kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions: 0 g/km.[1]

Find Your Passion

This isn’t a stealth birding propaganda film (though there are
some very cool birding clubs around). Fit with an ecosystem of electric-mobility services and the quietest cabin and ride around, it doesn’t matter if you’re a lifelong birder or simply want to discover what drives you — pun intended. Mercedes-Benz’s EQ portfolio is making electric enjoyable again so you can find your passion in silence and style.

EQC 400 4MATIC: Combined electric energy consumption: 20.8–19.7
kWh/100 km; combined CO2 emissions: 0 g/km.[1]

We’ve come a long way since Carl Benz left that patent office
in 1886 and freed the world from the horse and carriage for good. But
throughout the 133 years of innovation, the pioneering passion has remained
woven into the brand’s DNA. Now it’s time for an all-electric era in mobility,
and with the Mercedes-Benz EQC model, we’ve finally found the sleek, silent
ride worthy of ushering us into the new dawn.

Ready to enjoy electric? Head to the EQC website for more information about the Mercedes-Benz EQC 400 4MATIC Edition 1886 and the Mercedes-Benz EQ brand.

[1]Electric energy consumption and range have been determined on the basis of Regulation (EC) No. 692/2008. Electric energy consumption and range depend on the vehicle configuration.

  • Head of Production: Klaudia Podsiadlo
  • Creative: Susanne Biermeir
  • Senior Project Manager: Sarah Vielhaus
  • Commissioning Editor: Aaron Howes
  • CGI: Manuel Carvalho
  • Digital Design & Development: Katerina Vaseva
  • Prod. Company: BWGTBLD GmbH
  • Director: The Factory
  • DP: Jan-David Günther
  • Executive Producer: Jakob Preischl
  • Producer: Anna Bauer
  • Styling: Lorenza Maza
  • Service: SUR Film
  • Edit: Michael Weicker, Markus Weicker
  • Color: Swen Linde @WFTG
  • VFX: Peter Schröppel, Peter Ruschel
  • Sound Design: Moritz Staub @Staub-Audio
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