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The traditional fashion production model, where designers put orders into production and yarns, fabrics and garments travel the world several times over before they even get to customers, is trashing the environment, but you knew that already. For Brooklyn-based designer Alan Eckstein, fashion’s wasteful over-production was seen not as a problem, but an opportunity.

Rather than start new garments from scratch, Eckstein is instead adopting an innovative new business model — customizing and re-working people’s cast-off clothes. His project, Everyone Wins, sees the designer taking pre-worn garments and re-purposing them with new cuts, added embellishments and lavish embroideries. That means each piece is unique — something that’s harder than ever to find these days — and customers can shop safe in the knowledge that they’re making one small step towards a less wasteful future.

Eckstein, who spent years behind-the-scenes in the streetwear industry, cites jazz musicians and the Sapeurs, a subculture from central Africa, as major inspirations. Explaining his project via telephone, he says that the “chaos” of streetwear, where cultures and influences collide at OG stores like Union LA, were also a key point of reference for Everyone Wins.

Shop the Eckstein’s one-of-a-kind pieces now over at the Everyone Wins online store.

Words by Alec Leach
Digital Fashion Editor

Alec Leach grew up in Brighton, England, but now lives in Berlin, where he leads Highsnobiety's digital fashion content.

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