Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
18 more
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Justin Sutcliffe
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey
Ice Watch / Charlie Forgham Bailey

A public installation in London by artist Olafur Eliasson and geology professor Minik Rosing is connecting passers-by with the stark reality of climate change.

Titled “Ice Watch,” the interactive exhibit is located at two hectic London spots — outside the Tate Modern art gallery and Bloomberg’s European headquarters — and boasts a simple concept. Yesterday, while the COP24 climate conference takes place in Katowice, Poland and just before the third anniversary of the Paris Agreement at COP21, 30 immense blocks of ice harvested from the Nuup Kangerlua fjord in Greenland were placed in the two locations and left to melt.

Weighing 110 tonnes in total, the ice blocks mark a fraction of the yearly loss from Greenland’s ice sheet.

Eliasson explained that the exhibition’s aim is to stop us growing “numb and passive” to the loss of the world’s polar ice sheets. “‘Ice Watch’ arouses feelings of proximity, presence, and relevance, of narratives that you can identify with and that make us all engage,” the artist said. “We must recognize that together we have the power to take individual actions and to push for systemic change.

“Come touch the Greenland ice sheet and be touched by it. Let’s transform climate knowledge into climate action.”

“Ice Watch” will remain until the ice melts. Will you check it out? Let us know in the comments.

Now, here are our 10 favorite pieces from Art Basel Miami Beach 2018.

Staff Writer
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