Style
Where the runway meets the street

If a referendum were held over deciding the most lauded fashion era in the last century, the early 2000s wouldn’t quite receive the most popular vote. Known as a mash-up period where trends from decades prior were gaudily styled, embellished and tailored, the noughties, when spoken about in retrospect, have been pretty much condemned to sartorial hell.

After all, this was a time when Ed Hardy, sequined tube tops and velour tracksuits with rhinestone logos emblazoned across the rear were considered fashionable (although the latter seems to have made something of a comeback recently).

But this is fashion we’re talking about, where trends are constantly being invented, repurposed, laid to rest and then resurrected again (this industry isn’t one noted for its steadfastness). The ’90s have experienced a very cushy comeback for a while now, so is it finally time to embrace all things Y2K? MISBHV seems to think so.

For its first ever womenswear presentation, the progressive Polish label decided to reminiscence on the glory days of clubbing in Eastern Europe during the early ’00s. In case you need a visual reference, watch this video here below.

Pawing over a swath of styles that characterized various subcultures from the era (a defining element of former electronic music fashion scenes), the collection’s deconstructive streetwear twist gave it a very contemporary feeling, despite its niche narrative.

Top-to-bottom low-rise denim getups, a glittery pink chiffon slip-dress and exposed monogram-printed lingerie harked back to pop princesses and celebutant “It” girls that dominated the tabloids back in the day (Lindsay, Paris, Britney and the like). Traces of nu-metal and hardstyle rave came in the form of ultra wide-leg, JNCO-like trousers, wallet chains and motocross racing gear. Oversized hoodies and tees featured bold, blinged-out graphics that you’ve probably seen worn in your favorite crunk rap music video (shout out to Lil Jon).

The brand also showcased a few collaborative pieces created with Instagram darling Sita Abellan, including a silky Japanese kimono ornamented with the word “PAIN” across the back, boxing shorts and gloves.

Once the presentation started, sounds of melodic vocal trance (nearly lost it when “Ecstasy” by ATB came on) boomed throughout the room as the models stood on a white stage covered in pink and yellow roses. Not a huge spectacle, but it didn’t really need to be – the clothes spoke for themselves.

Be sure to follow SS17 to stay au courant with all of this season’s Fashion Week happenings. 

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