It’s a rainy, miserable night when we show up to Post Malone’s concert venue in Berlin. Skipping the line and feeling like superstars, we head backstage and are instantly greeted by a very chill Post, already sipping on the vodka orange in preparation to pick up the mic. Immediately offered to come “chill on the couch” and “grab a drink,” this guy already makes use feel like someone we’ve been hanging with on a regular basis.

The 21-year-old is already quick on the come up, but you’d never guess it upon meeting his super chill self in person. Since his hit song “White Iverson” blew him to fame last year, Post has been picking up the pace. The song, although originally released as a single, appeared with 13 other bangers on his debut album Stoney. And in the two months since its release he’s been international, delivering show after show after show.

When one thinks of urban music, the name ‘Post Malone’ doesn’t pop straight to mind. But it is inevitably a more accurate description of what he does; “rapper” is not his preferred label. His eclectic blend of hip-hop and R&B tinged with super lax country and folk vibes makes for a trippy listening experience anytime he pops up on a playlist. He’s collaborated with the likes of Justin Bieber and Kehlani, and has already managed to be roasted by Charlamagne Tha God on ‘The Breakfast Club’. And you know what they say: you know you’ve made it when you got the haters.

We ended up chatting with Malone backstage for quite a while. See below for some highlights.

The Interview

In your most famous song, “White Iverson”, you’ve mentioned that you’re “saucing” on someone. I’ve Genius lyric’d all your lyrics but for the average listener who isn’t a complete nerd, could you explain what it means to “sauce”?

I guess saucing on someone, it’s the same as to swag on someone. There are different interpretations for it. You’re being yourself, but you’re also much better than the other person.

You dropped your first mixtape in high school; how would you rate it now?

It was bullshit, sucked so much, but I thought it was the shit. I’ve made all the beats on there, and I did a couple of songs with kids that went to my school. I recorded it at my friend’s house, without having anything. He blessed me enough to let me use it, microphone and everything.

Your music is such an eclectic combination of genres; how would you describe it in 3 words?

Tight, chill and cool. As you can see I spent a lot of time as a kid reading the dictionary. Such a thug.

Tell me about the first time you smoked weed. How did it go? What was the situation?

I was at my friend Daniel’s house. Shoutout to Daniel! We were there, and then we went to a band practice. I was just jamming with them, just hanging out. They had their own band, I had my own, so I just went over there to scope the situation out, to see what I got to compete with. His parents were out of town, and then after that we just invited all of our friends over and he had a nice house with a pool and all that stuff. We just sat around back and he was like “Yo, you want to smoke some of this pot?” and I went like “Not really, but I will give it a go, because I’m not no bitch”. So he gives me this bong, I hit it and it was milky. I take it all and went like “it didn’t do shit.” So I told to give me another one, milked that, then I literally coughed for 20 minutes straight, and I was very high! I was freaking out!

Have you ever felt any kind of hindrance being a white artist in the urban/ R&B/hip-hop scene?

Of course it’s tough, It’s different, we should put that shit aside, because it’s so not 2017. We should just come together as people. I think it’s really important to come together as humans, not as white people or black people, green and blue people.

Listen to the full interview below.

For more of our music features, take a look at our chat with hip-hop photographer extraordinaire Lisa Leone.

  • Photographer & Videographer: Ahmed Chrediy
  • Videographer: Max Daab
  • Video Editor: Louie McPherson
  • Transcriber: Sanzhar Toxanbayev
  • Production Support: Karolina Mitura
  • Editor: Jake Boyer
  • Producer: Thomas Jamison
  • Author: Naina Kamath
Social Media Editor

American based in Berlin, aspiring to be Drake's champagne mami.

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