NYC. LONDON. TOKYO.

MEET THE ARTHUR.

After a year spent stripping the iconic British brand back to its seams, chief creative officer Riccardo Tisci’s vision for a new Burberry era has landed. Enter: the Burberry Arthur. To celebrate the launch of the luxury sneaker, we linked up with local legends making waves in their own communities.

From a fruit stand owner turned street style star in London to NYC’s jeweler to the stars and Tokyo’s most fashionable restaurant owner, slide through to see how the six talents are wearing the Burberry Arthur sneakers as they build their legacies.


Call her OG Ma, Gold Mother, or, as Macklemore does, second mom, but it’s Macau-born jewelry shop owner Chiokva Va Sam’s best-known moniker, A$AP Eva, that reveals the upper echelon celebr class = “xpr-br”ities she’s lucky to call her regular clientele. Thanks to the A$AP Rocky’s high praises, when members of the A$AP Mob need a new chain, they stop by Eva’s mini-empire Popular Jewelry, which sits amid the chaos of souvenir shops and tourist traffic in Chinatown, Manhattan. Pharrell, Cee-lo Green, and Elephant Man are also among her customers, and she’s even created bespoke jewelry for Beyoncé’s Formation tour. 24K luxury, here, is the name of the game, and, over the years, Eva has diligently paved her own path in platinum.



As the “troublemaker and overachiever” in her family and a student who “was never good at sitting still” at school, Eva says, “I’ve always been a creative and curious individual; I always got in trouble for exhibiting those traits when I was young.” Over time, her contrarian tendencies became her greatest asset.

When Eva signed her first lease for her brck-and-mortar on 255 Canal Street on October 3rd, 1988 (coincidentally enough, the exact same month, day, and year as A$AP Rocky’s birthday), she already set her sights on disrupting the industry. A savvy entrepreneur, Eva was among the first jewelers in the area to diversify her selection, expanding to customizable grillz and other bling, in order to attract a broader demographic. However, what has truly defined her success isn’t just this shrewd business acumen, but rather a sense of integrity towards everyone who ducks through her maroon-red awning—regardless of whether or not they boast a six-figure-plus salary. Years ahead of her competitors, Eva was able to recognize the aspiration in the everyman.

“While many jewelry shops in the early days ignored [and] refused to serve certain customers if they didn’t fit a certain profile or background or even refuse to let them into the shop, I embraced everyone that walked through my door, even those that didn’t have much money to buy my jewelry,” she remembers. “Those same people later had saved more money and progressed further in their careers and had chosen to shop with me because of how I treated them when they didn’t have much.”

“I’ll be on my feet most of the time, so in order to pass positive vibes along to my team and customers,
I need to feel positive myself.”

A$AP Eva

As an industrious trailblazer championing good intentions, it’s no question why Burberry tapped Eva to be one of their NYC ambassadors for the new Arthur sneaker. It’s this pioneering spirit towards her craft and attitude to others that continues to bolster her business to this day. Eva is just as likely to experiment with cutting-edge technology in jewelry design as she is to leverage her shop as a catalyst for steadfast optimism.



During an average day, she grinds for at least 12 hours straight. “I’ll be on my feet most of the time so in order to pass positive vibes along to my team and customers, I need to feel positive myself,“ she explained. As such, her uniform mainly consists of cozy, dark-colored layers and a slick, yet resilient, pair of trainers.



Eva’s high-minded ideology got her to the top, and she’s determined to lift others up with her. “I’ve always been a leader,” she proudly declared. “I believe in being a positive influencer and motivating others to be the best version of themselves. I’ve always preached to my team and everyone around me to leave the world better than [how] we found it.”

See inside Popular Jewelry as Eva unboxes her custom pair of Arthur sneakers and gives tips on how she would style them (hint: it involves diamonds).

  • Project Manager: Johanna Laura Gerhardt
  • Art Director: Stella Richter
  • Creative Lead: Delia Reyes
  • Production: Chad Ghiron
  • Talent Manager & Casting: Fania Folaji
  • Creative: Patrick Chambers
  • Photographer: Evan Browning
  • Photo Assistant: Andrew Espinal
  • 2nd Photo Assistant: Don Brodie
  • Fashion Director: Atip Wananuruks
  • Styling: Shabdiece Esfahani
  • Styling Assistant: Zhane Santiesteban
  • Hair & Make-Up: Valissa Yoe
  • Videographer: Willem Verbeeck
  • PA: Luis Vazquez
  • Editor: Sam Walker
  • Model: A$AP Eva

MEET THE OTHER LOCAL LEGENDS






  • Location
    Harlem, NYC
  • Role
    Barber at Denny Moe’s
    Superstar Barbershop
  • Follow
    @dennymoes

At Denny Moe’s Superstar Barbershop, they make you feel like family. Among the din of swiveling black chairs, buzzing clippers, and swish of maroon capes, sit devoted clientele and newcomers alike, who have stopped by the Harlem institution to freshen up, shoot the shit, and even play the odd game of chess. “The most rewarding aspect of my work is making people feel good about themselves inside and out,” says the Philadelphia-native barber Josh Hammond (aka Jayout), who has spent the past 21 years honing his craft, about half of which has been spent uptown at Denny Moe’s. To him, the shop not only represents a sanctuary, but it’s also among the stalwart bastions of black culture in a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood.

Denny Moe’s, sat on the historic thoroughfare Fredrick Douglas Boulevard, descends into a robust tradition of black-owned barbershops in America. These businesses initially served wealth white patrons, which meant black barbers and grooming technicians were among the first to achieve financial prosperity through their trade in their communities. Towards the latter half of the century, the spaces evolved into a type of public forum for local gossip or neighborhood happenings, as well as a home away from home—far away from the constraints of family, church, or work, where many black men found a sympathetic ear as they received a regular trim.

Therapy and therapists, it seems, come in many forms. And Jayout wants his customers—of all ages and genders—to know that they’re in good hands. When he moved to New York from Philadelphia 11 years ago, he originally worked at a spot called Levels until he Googled “the #1 [barber]shop in Harlem” and switched to Denny Moe’s. If that’s not enough assurance, under the ‘philosophy’ panel on his personal website, he inquires, “Whatever happened to the good old days, when your hairstylist was just one person who knew every strand on your head, and knew exactly what cut and style to give you?” He answers his own question with self-possession: “Those days never went anywhere.”

“The most rewarding aspect of my work is making people feel good about themselves inside and out.”

Jason "Jayout" Hammond

While Jayout hopes to cultivate a comforting familiarity with his client base, there’s still an element of nonconformity—plus his “Philly swag with a New York vibe–that’s helped him amass the loyal Internet following he enjoys today. Allow the man a bit of creative flair, and expect a ‘do unlike ever before. Alongside the shop standard of full-service classic Caesar with hairline, sideburn, and neck touch ups, he also offers undercuts embossed with playful lotus flowers, shooting stars, three-leaf clovers, and tribal-esque geometric shapes.



“Style and innovation are the perfect balance to creating your own legacy,” he says. As such, Burberry’s newest sneaker, the Arthur, is the ideal accessory to his distinct ethos. Jayout’s daring for greatness falls into lockstep with the brand’s history of championing trailblazers.



Now that he’s catching eyes online for his work, he muses, “It’s cool be recognized outside of where you’re from.” But make no mistake, there’s no bigger honor for Jay than seeing the smile on his customer’s face when they walk out Denny Moe’s glass door, more confident in themselves than before.

  • Project Manager: Johanna Laura Gerhardt
  • Art Director: Stella Richter
  • Creative Lead: Delia Reyes
  • Production: Chad Ghiron
  • Talent Manager & Casting: Fania Folaji
  • Creative: Patrick Chambers
  • Photographer: Evan Browning
  • Photo Assistant: Andrew Espinal
  • 2nd Photo Assistant: Don Brodie
  • Fashion Director: Atip Wananuruks
  • Styling: Shabdiece Esfahani
  • Styling Assistant: Zhane Santiesteban
  • Hair & Make-Up: Valissa Yoe
  • PA: Luis Vazquez
  • Editor: Sam Walker
  • Model: Jason ‘Jay Out’ Hammond

MEET THE OTHER LOCAL LEGENDS







A long time ago, before 59-year-old London fruit vendor Lance Walsh went viral for his Supreme addiction, he was a child with humble dreams of owning his own small local business. “I started off on a flower stall as a young boy, and worked my way up to get my own stall,” he says, in an ever so slight Cockney twang.

But that was pre-Internet fame. These days, it’s not his exotic fruits that rack up the visitors to his tiny Berwick Street stand. Rather, it’s his persona as an unlikely, homegrown streetwear icon, posing among tangerines and papayas in “down-to-earth and relaxed” fits, that brings a good chunk of his 54K Instagram followers to meet-and-greet IRL. Walsh says the biggest change for him since all likes started rolling in has been “being recognized by fans from all over the world; every single day people approach me.”

A staple within “the vibrant and lively community of Soho” for over 30 years, Walsh credits his skyrocket to social media fame for being at, as he puts it succinctly, at “right place at the right time.” It seems, though, he’s been at the right place for a long time. Back when he was 10 years old, Walsh would frequent the markets to offer support to his father, who was something of an entrepreneur himself and sold sheepskin coats for extra cash on the weekends. Eventually, he landed a Saturday job sweeping up, then traded up for a flower stall for 15 years, only to switch to hawking lychees and papayas as his bread and butter—long before they were a quotidian grocery item.



It should be noted that Walsh has always been a man of refined taste. When he was younger, his grandmother, a window cleaner at a cashmere shop on Old Bond Street, would smuggle him samples of plush sweater sets and socks until the average high street weaves no longer sufficed. So when did Supreme enter the picture?

“I’m just living
my life. I hope
to send positivity through my work.”

Lance Walsh

Roughly five years ago, Walsh dipped his toe into the hypebeast pool by copping a hat from a nearby Supreme store. Since then, he was hooked. The practicality, he claims, is unbeatable, and the clothes keeps him both warm and fitted, even when it’s pissing down, as it always tends to in London.



Regardless of his reasoning, Walsh shirks the assumption that streetwear is exclusive to youth culture. And this is precisely why Burberry, a brand that prides themselves on championing trailblazers from all walks of life, handpicked him as one of their London reps for the launch of their new Arthur sneaker.



Fashion should still remain playful and experimental at any age. Walsh wears this philosophy on his sleeve with his bold-printed magenta button-up, yellow and red faux fur coat, and pink camo t-shirt—topped off with an on-trend black bucket hat, every so slightly askew. “I’m just living my life,” he states, “I hope to send positivity through my work.”

Watch as Walsh unboxes the Arthur sneaker at his fruit stand on Berwick Street and weighs in on his favorite features and how he would style them.

  • Project Manager: Johanna Laura Gerhardt
  • Art Director: Stella Richter
  • Creative Lead: Delia Reyes
  • Production: Semjon Pitschugin
  • Talent Manager & Casting: Fania Folaji
  • Creative: Patrick Chambers
  • Photographer: Nick Van Tiem
  • Photo Assistant: Ryan Rivers
  • Fashion Director: Atip Wananuruks
  • Styling: Sophie Casha
  • Hair & Make-Up: Anne Timper
  • Set Runner: Savannah Jones
  • Videographer: Blue Laybourne
  • Boom Operator: Lorenzo Garrido
  • Editor: Sam Walker
  • Model: Lance Walsh

MEET THE OTHER LOCAL LEGENDS






  • Location
    Hackney, London
  • Role
    Curator, Radio Host & DJ
  • Social Media
    N/A

Tabitha Thorlu-Bangura never particularly wanted to be a DJ, but some things are just meant to happen. “I was just a really obsessive music fan” she explained of the period before she came to dominate Britain’s underground music scene. By now, it’s almost cliche to call someone a multi-hyphenate creative, but there’s almost no other way to encapsulate the woman who juggles a radio show and acts as Creative Partnerships Director for the online NTS radio station, produces music and cultural events at Somerset House Studios, and DJs under the moniker TTB.

Coming from Freetown, Sierra Leone, the young artist and curator has staked out a position in London as one of the city’s most influential cultural programmers at a time when the city (and country) is in desperate need of some diversity and a few good tracks to unwind to.


It’s no wonder that she’s curated a dedicated following on and off the internet for her work in support of emerging artists and her tendency to “fuck with peoples’ brains” at artistic institutions like the Tate. Or, that she’s now landed in the sights of Burberry. Taking a breather from her busy schedule, she hit the streets to front a campaign for the British brand’s new Arthur sneaker launch — a perfect fit for someone who spends her days running around London to five million meetings or elevating herself “up and down the many stairs of the NTS offices.”

“Radio is all about shared passion — how could that not be inspiring?”

Tabitha Thorlu-Bangura

All the running and record spinning and radio gigs may be enough to make a normal person’s head spin, but it’s just all part of the vision. And while the mention of radio might evoke thoughts of CD players, affordable colleges, or other old-timey inventions, for Tabitha, it’s a perfect outlet. “Radio is about the human touch, which is why I think that any doubts about its future as a medium are pretty misguided. I hope that people will always want to connect on a deeper level, and not just have algorithms dictating what they listen to. Radio is all about shared passion — how could that not be inspiring?”

  • Project Manager: Johanna Laura Gerhardt
  • Art Director: Stella Richter
  • Creative Lead: Delia Reyes
  • Production: Semjon Pitschugin
  • Talent Manager & Casting: Fania Folaji
  • Creative: Patrick Chambers
  • Photographer: Nick Van Tiem
  • Photo Assistant: Ryan Rivers
  • Fashion Director: Atip Wananuruks
  • Styling: Sophie Casha
  • Hair & Make-Up: Anne Timper
  • Set Runner: Savannah Jones
  • Boom Operator: Lorenzo Garrido
  • Editor: Sam Walker
  • Model: Tabitha Thorlu-Bangura

MEET THE OTHER LOCAL LEGENDS







  • Location
    Nakameguro, Tokyo
  • Role
    Co-Owner of Breakfast Club Tokyo
    and Mama Luli Catering
  • Follow
    @breakfastclubtokyo

There may be no better city than Tokyo for street style aficionados. It’s here, in Japan’s capital, that the quota of cool, well-dressed people can feel as overwhelming as the number of neon signs dotting the streets. Yet, even in this overstimulating visual sea, it’s impossible to ignore Mama Luli (née Luli Shioi). As the co-owner of the Higashiyama diner café Breakfast Club Toyko and mastermind behind Mama Luli Catering, she’s staked out a name for herself in the city’s flourishing culinary scene not only because she makes damn good food, but also because of the high-fashion crowd she attracts.

No surprise given that, in the decades before opening Breakfast Club with her “soul brother” Kunichi Nomura, she was living an extravagant life that any modern-day “influencer” could only dream about. “I spent the entire 1980s in NYC as a downtown musician,” she explained of her life before hitting the gastronomy scene. “[I] came back to Tokyo in 1990 and worked as a creative director, hosting numerous nights at legendary night clubs, such as GOLD, MILK, X+Y, and Le Baron de Paris Tokyo.”

After years of working in nightlife, it was the old women sitting at cash registers in their shops greeting and talking to locals that inspired her to open a catering business in 2012 and, in 2016, start a Breakfast Club that was a bit more literal than John Hughes’ cinematic classic. “I wanted to create a community space where I could be in direct touch with people and work ‘till old age.” Consider that goal achieved. With her street cred established after a career in nightlife, Mama Luli and Kunichi found that their creative clientele “followed us by word of mouth as we moved.”

“Like the way mushroom’s underground networks work,
I wish for individuals to connect, support, and inspire each other for the benefit of all beings.”

Luli Shioi

With years of experience under her belt, she’s now watched her roving group of supporters grow up, while attracting a new generation to her and Kunichi’s restaurant. “We are drawn to artists and their creative energies. We are curious about what they do, their stories and moves. All we do is to greet each person every day, making sure they feel comfortable in our space and send well wishes when they leave.”

Of course, it isn’t all smiles and well wishes. Breakfast Club Tokyo’s sustaining legacy is built on the hard work that Mama Luli puts into the restaurant every day. And if there’s one thing to know about food service, it’s that to make it in this world, the sneakers slipped on before opening shop make all the difference. Luckily for her fans and supporters, Mama Luli knows her way around a pair of kicks, which is why she’s a perfect fit to front the Burberry Arthur campaign. Beyond her eclectic collection of designer and vintage threads, she’s also served up sneakerhead realness while waitressing.


For Mama Luli, a good pair of sneakers give her good posture and, of course, make her stand out, but don’t think of Breakfast Club Tokyo as the epicenter of fashion. As fun as it is for her to dress up and show off her kicks, the message Mama Luli’s hopes to convey is simple and, naturally, is explained best with an analogy rooted in food: ”Like the way mushroom’s underground networks work, I wish for individuals to connect, support, and inspire each other for the benefit of all beings.”

  • Project Manager: Johanna Laura Gerhardt
  • Art Director: Stella Richter
  • Creative Lead: Delia Reyes
  • Production: Semjon Pitschugin
  • Tokyo Producer & Casting: Taka Arakawa
  • Tokyo Production Assistant: Emma Schwarz
  • Talent Manager & Casting: Fania Folaji
  • Creative: Patrick Chambers
  • Photographer: Den Niwa
  • Photo Assistant: Kyoka Ikemura
  • Photo Assistant: Ino Yu
  • Fashion Director: Atip Wananuruks
  • Styling: Tatsuya Shimada
  • Styling Assistant: Yuta Mitsui
  • Hair & Make-Up: Nori
  • Hair & Make-Up Assistant: Ai Uekawa
  • Model: Mama Luli – Luli Robinson

MEET THE OTHER LOCAL LEGENDS






  • Location
    Shibuya, Tokyo
  • Role
    Manager of Beatcafe and
    Founder/Owner of Dotlinecircle
  • Follow
    @beatcafe

It’s hard to imagine finding anything beyond brightly lit chaos in the “Times Square of Tokyo” known as Shibuya City. The towering neon and screens are enough to send most into a sensory overload, it’s past the bustling center, down in the Dogenzaka Maruyama-cho area, that a dive bar called Beat Cafe has become a hotspot for the city’s creative class.

Of course, its status as a local hangout for artists and music lovers alike is no accident. Everything from the dim lighting and graffiti- and sticker-strewn walls to the carefully curated music has kept Katoman’s vibe for the bar untouched, a lifelong purveyor of all things music. Before opening the Beat Cafe’s infamously nondescript black door to Tokyo in 2006, he spent the ‘90s at radio stations, record shops, and even began his own music agency, Dotlinecircle, to do releases, live bookings, and management.


Katoman himself has achieved a fair level of fame — the experimental band Battles recorded a Japanese bonus track named after him for their debut album and he appeared on the second season of Master of None as a ramen chef. But it’s his dive bar that has become the true star; regularly packed with an achingly cool mix of locals and expats that has served up a home away from home for music lovers. “Beat Cafe is a cross point of people who like music, art, [and] skate culture,” he says with pride. “It’s awesome.” Also awesome, if not somewhat unexpected for a man who bluntly declared that he has no style, is the role he’s stepped beyond the bar for: fronting the Japanese campaign for Burberry’s luxury Arthur sneakers.

“Beat Cafe is a cross point of people who like music, art, [and] skate culture.
It’s awesome.”

Katoman

As much as he may claim that “no style is my style,” his nonchalant approach is exactly that kind of vibe that outlasts any sort of fashion trend — and has won him accolades online as the internet discovers the Beat Cafe from hundreds of thousands of miles away. “Now It’s so easy to connect with people from outside Japan. This is great for me,” he says of his new presence on social media. As humble as he may be about seemingly every aspect of life, ask anyone who walks through the door of his Beat Cafe and they’ll tell you that Kato Man and his music haven is by far the best hidden gem in Shibuya City.

  • Project Manager: Johanna Laura Gerhardt
  • Art Director: Stella Richter
  • Creative Lead: Delia Reyes
  • Production: Semjon Pitschugin
  • Tokyo Producer & Casting: Taka Arakawa
  • Tokyo Production Assistant: Emma Schwarz
  • Talent Manager & Casting: Fania Folaji
  • Creative: Patrick Chambers
  • Photographer: Den Niwa
  • Photo Assistant: Kyoka Ikemura
  • Photo Assistant: Ino Yu
  • Fashion Director: Atip Wananuruks
  • Styling: Tatsuya Shimada
  • Styling Assistant: Yuta Mitsui
  • Hair & Make-Up: Nori
  • Hair & Make-Up Assistant: Ai Uekawa
  • Model: Katoman

MEET THE OTHER LOCAL LEGENDS