With each new season from New York City skateboarding label Supreme, many of us head directly to the brand's website and scroll right to the bottom to check out the accessories. In the past, the brand's box logo-laden accessories have garnered surprise and even shock, like the time Supreme included a brick in its FW16 drop.

Crowbars, boxing gloves, dirt bikes, and fire extinguishers are among the Supreme accessories that have provoked the question, "Who the hell would buy this?" The answer is, of course, not the people who would use these accessories for their intended use, but rather collectors who aim to stick them on a shelf to look at them.

To gain new perspective on Supreme's eyebrow-raising accessories, we tapped trained designers to share their thoughts through an academic lens.

When you're done, check out Supreme's SS20 accessory collection in full.

b.b. simon x Supreme Belt

"I'm not really into tacky bling. It looks a bit DIY, and I feel sorry for the factory workers who have to labor over this kind of work. I’m sure people will be lining up for it, but it’s not really my taste."

- Stephen Russell, Product Designer (Formerly Jaguar, Rolls-Royce, adidas)

"Are these Swarovski crystals? Finally a piece that looks supreme rather than just saying "Supreme." Dieter Rams' school of "less is more/less but better" would instantly expel me for saying this, but I’m feeling the design. For statement pieces like this, you want to go more excessive to show it's intentional by design. I appreciate that Supreme didn't go with their red and white color palette for crystals. That would have ended badly, turning this belt from cheesy to just cheap."

- Mino Kodama, Product Designer at Native Instruments (Formerly BMW, Martin Margiela, Calvin Klein)

"How was it again? More is less? Less or more? Anyway, just add some more crystals."

- Daniel Rojas Keyser, Design Manager at LIGANOVA GmbH

"Is this the belt Britney was wearing on the all-denim look with Justin? Very over-the-top. I guess this bling bling cowboy belt must be worn with a lot of courage and a pair of sunglasses to keep your sight healthy."

Omayra Maymó, Architect & Designer

Tupac Hologram Skateboard

"I like the playful use of the hologram. 2020 feels like a good year to play around with techy graphic executions like this. The use of avatars to promote brands is gaining more popularity; it’s interesting Supreme has chosen to revive Tupac. I’m not sure how relevant he is with skateboard culture, and the fact he’s not around to be asked what he thinks of it will surely split opinion amongst fans."

- Stephen Russell

"I love Tupac. I love holograms. I love skateboards. However, this combination is just confusing. Yes, I get that Tupac is wearing low-key Supreme boxers here, but it’s so subtle, so why bother? I'd still buy the skateboard for Tupac. Not for Supreme."

- Mino Kodama

"Typical design dilemma: If you scale it down, you would have the whole picture of Tupac uncovered by the trucks, but then the branding on his boxers would be too small. Decisions, decisions..."

- Daniel Rojas Keyser

"Another Tupac tribute skateboard. But this one immortalizes the late rapper’s figure while perpetuating the legacy of the extraordinary technical achievement of the Tupac hologram at Coachella. 2-in-1. And worth mentioning is the unbeatable display of those Supreme boxers."

- Omayra Maymó

Lawn Chair

"It’s a nice take on the classic fold-up. Not a lot added or taken away from your standard chair. Shame it doesn’t recline, that would have been a nice touch. The all-over print branding looks tasteful and creates a nice pattern, in the way it's broken up with the weave. Nice product for the festivals, or for the balcony, garden, or rooftop... you could take it wherever you want."

- Stephen Russell

"I have seen a lot of furniture pieces by Supreme and usually it's all about the Supreme logo slapped on some red or white surface. The logo is never used to its supreme potential but here it plays an integral role in the design. This lawn chair pleases my Asian designer heart. The use of the Supreme tape as the webbing is functional and clever. Ordinary things deserve a life upgrade, too."

- Mino Kodama

"This chair saves production costs, this chair saves storage space, this chair is practical, this chair is even recycling-friendly! But this chair is also ugly. Aesthetics are important! If it's not beautiful, it's not finished yet."

- Daniel Rojas Keyser

"My favorite; I could have this in my living room. This lawn chair might as well have been designed for Droog in the '90s as part of the Dutch experimental design current. I have always loved ironic products like this, when a traditional and apparently low-grade product is twisted in a witty and modern way to obviously combine opposites and create unforeseen contrasts."

- Omayra Maymó

Supreme x Mechanix Original Work Gloves

"Its a pretty simple flip on the standard glove. The sublimated graphic works well; I like the irony with the nails/workwear."

- Stephen Russell

"I didn't even notice these were Supreme. I can definitely see that they are Mechanix, known for their quality and high performance gloves. The rugged design is ruined by the steel nails print. I don't have OCD or aichmophobia, but the pattern gives me anxiety. I think the previous Mechanix collab design was too predictable and basic. It said 'Supreme,' like, 100 times. These new gloves have 100 nails on them but that doesn’t make them better. At least they bothered to put the Supreme logo on the brick. Life is tough."

- Mino Kodama

"Nails on gloves, the danger powerless printed on the protection. Then the chaotic position of the nails sending this powerful message of aggressiveness. You pretty much nailed it!"

- Daniel Rojas Keyser

"Without being overly designed, these working gloves have a bit of an edge with that fresh print. It’s just the right amount of extra to make a normally dull item a bit more fun. And what mechanic doesn’t like a good nails-and-screws print?"

- Omayra Maymó

Supreme x Speedo Swim Goggles

"Looks like a fresh upgrade to what otherwise looks like a technically engineered speedo goggle. The polarized red lenses complement the logo details banded around the strap. I don’t really like the sharp lines of the original goggle, it looks a bit sci-fi superhero and probably isn’t helped by the polarized tint."

- Stephen Russell

"These Speedo goggles are the McLaren of swim goggles (I think). You can see and feel the research and development that went into these. So much innovation and new technology morphed into this beautiful organic form. It's like a piece of art which I can study for hours (before actually wearing them); Speedo and Supreme’s collaboration seems to complement and elevate each other's brand image. The 'sunset' tint of the lens adds a romantic notion to the fierce design elements. The placement of the Supreme logo on the strap is clever because people will notice it when I am in the water. The red also works with the color of the lens! Damn! I hope to see someone wearing them at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo."

- Mino Kodama

"I think this should have been the briefing meeting with the designers vs. the result: 'And as we told you before, we want to give these goggles the Supreme identity: Red! White! Type! ...Hey! You didn't listen to us!'"

- Daniel Rojas Keyser

"Fancy and flashy, but actually with quite a beautiful, aerodynamic shape. You better be outstanding at swimming if you’re wearing these — all eyes will be on you in the pool. Otherwise you can just stay on the ledge and show-off."

- Omayra Maymó

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