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Earlier this month Spotify filed to go public on the New York Stock Exchange. As a followup, the streaming service is back with a new update, allowing users to edit song information, Variety reports.

Dubbed “Line-In,” the feature gives you the opportunity to showcase your music knowledge by changing metadata, ultimately describing genres and moods of songs and albums.

“Listeners describe music in different ways, and understanding that information will help improve, extend, and confirm the information that describes music on Spotify,” a spokesperson told Variety. “We hope to better understand how Spotify listeners interpret music, so that we can improve experiences for both listeners and artists.”

The update has already begun to roll out, as users can access Line-In on Spotify’s desktop platform by clicking on the three dots next to a song, album, or artist, and then tapping “suggest an edit.” Once transported to Line-In’s web interface, you can access and alter a variety of information surrounding the material.

“Over the past few months, we’ve confirmed our beliefs that listeners care deeply about the content on Spotify—they want the data to be useful and accurate,” said the company spokesperson. “We’ve also seen that listeners are eager to describe the music they’re passionate about in ways beyond traditional concepts like genre and mood.”

These edits, however, are merely seen as suggestions, as users do not have the ability to amend information and it change immediately on the platform.

“Spotify considers the source, and thoroughly reviews and checks the accuracy of this information, before the suggestions are folded into the data that powers our services,” the spokesperson added.

As Variety points out, Spotify is the “first music service of its size to launch a tool like Line-In.” For more on the new feature, visit Variety.

In other tech-related news, Instagram is reportedly testing a chronological feed again.

  • Source: Variety
  • Main / Featured Image: Noam Galai / Getty Images for Spotify

Not NYC, not LA.

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