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As we continue to explore the cultural renaissance permeating Boston through the lens of creative movers and shakers, Highsnobiety and ’47 present our final installment of this video series featuring Timmy Sneaks, an accomplished artist who began painting at an extremely early age.

At just 3-years-old, Sneaks had already discovered his passion for the arts, and it wasn’t until later in life that he truly found his calling as a mixed media painter. He didn’t always think being an artist was a viable career until he enrolled at the Savannah College of Art and Design. “I always knew it was a passion of mine but it was more recently that I was able to make it more than a passion and actually a lifetime thing,” Sneaks explains.

His artistic style can easily be recognized through a combination of bright neon colors blended with iconic pop culture references while typically incorporating mediums like acrylic, pastel, and spray paint. The end result is a truly unique body of work that’s earned him quite a reputation in the art space.

While Sneaks has already showcased at the prestigious Art Basel in Miami and has an enviable list of celebrity clientele ranging from Kevin Hart to Scott Disick to Robinson Cano, catering to the rich and famous isn’t his only goal: “Just the idea of showing my work and seeing people’s response to my work, I would say that’s the biggest motivation. Being able to see people enjoy my stuff.”

With all this success Sneaks says he could’ve easily left Boston to settle in cities like Los Angeles or New York where the established art markets are, but he’s remained steadfast to his hometown. “It’s always been a goal of mine to bring to light the Boston art scene, however small it is. It’s really been my home,” Sneaks recalls.

As the series comes to a close, check out our previous videos with rapper Jefe Replay and artist Fish McGill for more on New England’s elite creatives.

 Along with Boston’s ’47Highsnobiety is telling the story of people who’ve helped turned one of the oldest cities in America into a cultural hub. With hometown pride and the fearlessness to define success on their own terms, these people embody ’47’s mantra to “let your you out.” 

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