Dior Men’s artistic director Kim Jones unveiled his Pre-Fall collection in Tokyo earlier today. Jones established Dior’s futuristic leanings with metallic tailoring, iridescent outerwear, chest rig-like pouches, and some pieces designed with legendary Japanese illustrator Hajime Sorayama, who also provided the show’s spectacular decor.

Sorayama’s sexually suggestive depictions of cyborgs developed a cult following after the release of his book Sexy Robot in 1983. The hyper-detailed metallics, neon-tinted ’80s colorways, and uncanny intimacy of Sorayama’s work is as relevant as ever in 2018 and a perfect match for Jones’ ultra-modern vision for Dior.

Some highlights from the collection included gray slim-fitting tailored blazers and pants, shiny satin polo necks, white shirts with sheer floral detailing at the waist, tactical cargo pants, pearlescent puffer jackets, and a few ostentatiously branded logo sweatshirts.

Sorayama’s seductive cyborgs not only influenced the collection, but also the overall theme and set design.Whereas June’s SS19 catwalk had a flower-covered effigy of Christian Dior designed by KAWS, the catwalk centerpiece in Tokyo was a 12-meter-high robot statue designed by Sorayama, which began construction in mid-September. In addition, the show featured a pre-party at Tokyo’s famous Robot Restaurant, a dinner show combining Japan’s love for kitschy characters and fascination with technology.

At Jones’ Dior debut during Paris Fashion Week, we figured the designer was preparing Dior for the future. Today he seemed to be showing exactly how the storied French fashion house is going to power through the contemporary fashion landscape — with lots of lasers and a fearless immersion in futuristic materials.

Dior / Alessandro Garofalo

For anyone following Jones’ peripatetic Instagram account, it’s clear that the London-born designer is a dedicated globetrotter, a character trait that has informed his collections since his work at Louis Vuitton. The fact that this Pre-Fall collection was showing in Japan is no accident, as Christian Dior himself was enamoured with the country, taking design inspiration from traditional Japanese dress to inform his haute couture line.

When streetwear and fashion’s worlds began to overlap in 2016, Jones crystallized that merger with a legendary Louis Vuitton x Supreme collaboration. Here, he’s showing how he can also fuse the past with the future, compounding essential Dior elements — houndstooth tweed, the color pink, and the panthère print — with silver Mylar, utilitarian belt buckles (designed by Matthew Williams), and streamlined silhouettes that mirror the clean lines found in Sorayama’s work.

You can check out video footage of the show on Highsnobiety’s Instagram.

Words by Max Grobe
Associate Fashion Editor
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