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Supreme

In 2006, Dipset’s Jim Jones and Juelz Santana worked with Supreme on what is arguably the brand’s most iconic portrait T-shirt — something which Jones argues is worth a stake in the streetwear company.

In an interview with Complex in 2016, Jones revealed the shoot (which they were reportedly paid $14,000 for) was merely a business deal for him — one that he feels was exploitative.

“We might’ve had the hottest T-Shirt they ever did, but they ain’t paying homage,” he said. “The way I take is that it was a business deal. It was great for the moment but I ain’t get no residuals off of it. You know what I mean? They ain’t paying me no money off of each shirt that they sold, so it is what it is.”

Now it looks like Jones’s views haven’t gone away. Taking to Instagram, Jim Jones shared a behind-the-scenes image from the shoot and argued that Dipset’s involvement in one of Supreme’s most iconic T-shirts ever warrants a piece of the streetwear company.

The caption reads: “They owe us piece of th company rappers n my black people had no idea wht supreme was we didn’t even know wht they was they had tht bag and they new who dipset was lol #CultureCreators #TheSet #TBt.”

Do you agree with Jim Jones? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

In other style news, adidas to close stores as focus shifts to online retail.

Senior Staff Writer

Berlin-based writer and Rihanna enthusiast.

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