Cherry Glazerr
Other / CJ Harvey

Cherry Glazerr‘s Stuffed & Ready brilliantly captures the exhausting experience of being a woman at this current time. In the wake of the sociopolitical chaos that has recently transpired in America, it’s comforting to have a rock record like this that authentically expresses the raw feelings that so many of us carry everyday. One of the standout tracks off the album is “Daddi,” a satirical song that touches on the act of playing subservient roles in relationships with a not-so-subtle nod to BDSM.

Today, we’re premiering Reggie Watts‘ groovy remix of the single. This version is guaranteed to transport your mind to a safer space where disco balls are spinning non-stop as the world around you bursts into flames and burns to a crisp. (Too dark too soon?) Disco walked so this collaboration could run free.

Scroll down for our Q&A with frontwoman Clementine Creevy to learn more about the song while you stream the full remix.

How has it felt having the weight of your latest album off your shoulders since it came out in February?

There were a lot of moments during the record making process that felt like a release, especially while recording “Daddi” and “Stupid Fish.” There are some moments in those songs that give me a really cathartic feeling and recording them felt incredible. Having the album done feels like an accomplishment and I’m proud of us.

Even though it feels like it went by relatively quickly and was extremely fun haha. I realized the other day that I’ve made four albums at 22. Five actually but one is vaulted. I’ve tried to practice being more congratulatory towards myself recently. It was mostly fun as hell. It’s hard to think about the album in terms of having the weight of it off because the whole experience of being a musician and recording albums just feels like natural cause and effect.

Could you elaborate on the inspiration behind “Daddi”? What was going on in your life at the time when you wrote it?

You’ll never guess but I was actually coming out of a relationship with a cis man! Hahaha. It dawned on me how much time I spent subconsciously posing, acting, essentially role playing as a girlfriend/woman based on our collective idea of a young woman’s gender role. It hurt to realize how badly I’d been treating myself and how much I’d been emotionally starving myself by giving up my whole self to this man.

It felt so good and necessary for me at the time to craft the song in this way where I’m asking him what I should do and where I should go and then ripping it away in the chorus. Arranging the drums for the chorus was a hang up for us in the studio, it was hilarious. Tabor and Carlos and I paced and tried different ideas for three days straight until we finally decided on the pounding snare drum march.

Going off of that, the assertiveness of your tone combined with the production makes it come off as empowering. How were you able to strike that balance? What message do you want people to take away from this song?

The production of Stuffed and Ready came very naturally because Carlos and I had a strong rapport and I feel like everything in his studio automatically sounds good. We were always on the same page, which allowed a creative freedom and almost spiritual forward-moving pace. We pushed things to their extreme and then reigned them in as final touches instead of doing the opposite of that, which I think resulted in a really interesting feeling album.

What message do you want people to take away from this song?

Whatever they feel when listening to this song is the right thing, I’m not here to tell anyone how to feel.

Would you say that this remixed version of “Daddi” is an extension or departure from the original intent?

Such an amazing extension. It’s better than the original.

Why did you decide to have Reggie Watts remix this track specifically?

We met at one of our shows in LA on halloween at the KCRW Masquarade ball at the LA theatre. Obviously, I’ve been a fan for a long time and I had the boobs to just go up to him and start chatting because I thought we’d get along and we ended up having a fun night together. We all smoked a joint together and then Wajatta put on a killer set, so lively and dancey and perfect. A few days later I emailed him and asked him if he would be interested in doing a remix of “Daddi” and he said yes and we made it happen. I was floored when he sent me the track. I had no notes.

What sort of reactions do you tend to get whenever you perform “Daddi” live in front of a crowd?

People have been responding to that song and it’s been crazy. A lot of jumping and moshing during the chorus usually haha. But I think it’s mixed. The song is not for straight men, it is a song for women.

Which songs from Stuffed & Ready have people responded to the strongest at your shows? (My personal picks are “Stupid Fish” and “Distressor,” they hit me deep in the gut.)

Those ones! And people get crazy during “Wasted Nun” and “Daddi” as well. People have been singing the lyrics back to us. It’s been surreal. Of course I’m referring to our own packed little club shows across the US and Europe. Preforming to massive crowds that don’t know who you are (which we do a lot of) is different territory haha (and also great and euphoric).

Why is it important to you to use your platform to speak out about issues?

On one hand I don’t think musicians should be obligated to “use their platform.” Musicians are people who come in many shapes and sizes who have internal struggles and use art in the form and melody and words and rhythm to express themselves. Putting the pressure of spokesperson on them feels unnecessary to me.

On the other hand, I personally have felt strongly about women’s issues since I took women’s studies when I was 17 and it changed my life. And before then as well, just not as articulately. And I think any person, musician or non-musician or platform having person or non platform having person should speak out publicly about issues if they’re so compelled. That’s what’s cool about the internet and democracy.

What’s next on the agenda for Cherry Glazerr?

Big things, mommy. Hehe just kidding. JUST KIDDING I’M NOT JUST KIDDING. We have a lot of cool festivals coming up this summer and we’re excited to start working on some new music.

What do you hope to see change a year from now?

Well next year is 2020 and I think we all need to dump Trump because this whole thing is getting out of hand.

Words by Sydney Gore
Life & Culture Editor

Softcore tastemaker at your service.

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