Highsnobiety

Netflix has been accused of targeting black users with posters that replace white leads with secondary black cast members.

Writer Stacia L Brown pointed out the discrepancy between the posters for her suggested films and the actual stars. For Like Father, which is centered around Kelsey Grammer and Kristen Bell, Brown was shown an image of minor characters played by Blaire Brooks and Leonard Ouzts.

Your Highsnobiety privacy settings have blocked this Twitter post.

For Love Actually, the poster on Brown's Netflix includes Chiwetel Ejiofor and seems to suggest the film is a romance between him and Keira Knightley. Additionally, posters for Set it Up, Sierra Burgess is a Loser, and The Good Cop all featured black actors who were missing in the artwork served to some white users. See the examples below.

Your Highsnobiety privacy settings have blocked this Twitter post.

Netflix began personalizing artwork based on viewing habits last year, but many users took issue with the idea of targeting subscribers by race.

“It’s intrusive. It’s the dark side of marketing. I noticed it a while ago with a Zac Efron film that I’d already seen, but Netflix kept showing me it as a Michael B Jordan movie," podcast host Tolani Shoneye said to The Guardian.

“There was 30 minutes of a romcom I ended up watching last week because I thought it was about the black couple I was shown on the poster. I want to see those stories. They know I want to see those stories. Why don’t they just make more of them?”

In a statement to The Guardian, Netflix denied the claims.

"We don’t ask members for their race, gender or ethnicity so we cannot use this information to personalize their individual Netflix experience. The only information we use is a member’s viewing history," it said.

Now, here's how you can win tickets to see Jonah Hill’s ‘Mid90s’ in your city.

We Recommend
  • Exhausted Your Netflix’s Docuseries Supply? Here Are The 21 Best Documentaries on Youtube
    • Culture
  • Nike's Light-Absorbing Vantablack Air Force 1 Is for Color Snobs
    • Sneakers
  • Vanta-Who? Off-Black is the New Black
    • Style
    • sponsored
  • Inter x Highsnobiety: Re-Imagining The Famous Blue & Black Stripes
    • Style
  • "The Vince Staples Show" Brought Good Laughs & Good 'Fits
    • Style
What To Read Next
  • Supreme's New Owner Changes Nothing — Yet
    • Style
  • Nike's $200 Skate Denim Is as Engineered as Its Skate Shoes
    • Style
  • Sabrina Carpenter Is Gen Z’s Queen of Celebrity Fragrance
    • Beauty
  • Nike's Cutting-Edge Skate Shoe Got the Delicious Colorway It Deserves
    • Sneakers
  • Get Ready, Set, Ride! It's "Bike Air" Jordan Time
    • Sneakers
  • The Jordan 4 "Skate Shoes" Can't Stop Looking Good
    • Sneakers

Web Accessibility Statement

Titel Media GmbH (Highsnobiety), is committed to facilitating and improving the accessibility and usability of its Website, www.highsnobiety.com. Titel Media GmbH strives to ensure that its Website services and content are accessible to persons with disabilities including users of screen reader technology. To accomplish this, Titel Media GmbH tests, remediates and maintains the Website in-line with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), which also bring the Website into conformance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Disclaimer

Please be aware that our efforts to maintain accessibility and usability are ongoing. While we strive to make the Website as accessible as possible some issues can be encountered by different assistive technology as the range of assistive technology is wide and varied.

Contact Us

If, at any time, you have specific questions or concerns about the accessibility of any particular webpage on this Website, please contact us at accessibility@highsnobiety.com, +49 (0)30 235 908 500. If you do encounter an accessibility issue, please be sure to specify the web page and nature of the issue in your email and/or phone call, and we will make all reasonable efforts to make that page or the information contained therein accessible for you.