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Issey Miyake
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Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake
Issey Miyake

Japanese designer Issey Miyake has enjoyed a considerable rise in popularity over recent years, as his iconic designs have begun to populate the world’s fashion circles almost tenfold. From architects to budding fashionistas, his body of work is widely accessible, yet remains somewhat niche in its execution.

With his SS19 presentation at Paris Fashion Week helping to cement his legacy as a master of purist design and refined menswear, the collection was above all, subdued and elegant. Striped back, and presented in one of its most honest forms, with each piece strictly excluding tactless design and focusing on getting the essentials right. All thrills and no frills.

Having somewhat departed away from the pleats which helped spread his name like wildfire, SS19 called on alternative textural forms, mixed with Marni-like print work, distressed detailing reminiscent of earlier Stone Island products, and loose, drop-shoulder knitwear. It is refreshing to see the aforementioned pleated linework take on a new life in the form of printed stripes and linear fabric panelling.

And despite the simplicity of the collection as a whole, we can safely assume that both the technology and fabric used across all products is of commendable complexity.

Enjoy a look at Issey Miyake’s latest collection above, and as always, be sure to leave us a comment below with your thoughts.

In other fashion news, Virgil Abloh’s first-ever Louis Vuitton brought the world’s fashion community to a complete standstill. Check it out here.

Words by Adam Mark
Weekend Editor

Adam is Highsnobiety’s Weekend Editor and splits his time between overseeing all weekend content and studying Economic and Social Communication at Berlin’s University of the Arts.

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