Highsnobiety

Nike has officially revealed its Calm Mule shoe, a closed-toe evolution of the popular summer-ready Calm Slide that it launched back in June.

The Calm Mule, which features a fabric ankle strap, branding at the heel, and a debossed Nike Swoosh logo on the side, arrives in olive, black, and grey colorways.

According to rumors, Nike's Calm Mule is slated to be drop via Nike's website and stores later this year — the Calm Mule's release date isn't specific but expect an autumn release.

But hey, let’s not waste time by ignoring the elephant in the room: Nike’s new Calm Mule does look suspiciously like a technical version of Birkenstock's Boston Clog, right?

Your Highsnobiety privacy settings have blocked this Instagram post.

Miniature Swoosh aside, you'd be forgiven for thinking the Nike Calm Mule was actually Birkenstock's recently-released EVA Boston Clog, but alas it is not.

Still, they say that imitation is the best form of flattery, so perhaps the German label should consider Nike’s Boston-esque Calm Mule as a sign of appreciation for the style.

Saying that, from Birkenstock’s perspective, these sorts of imitations aren't anything new. In the last week alone we've seen labels like The Row and Novesta board the Boston wave with their own take on the slip-on Clog. But then again, can you blame them?

Last year Yoox, the luxury e-tailer, reported that the Birkenstock Boston sandal was its best-selling shoe that year, while Lyst estimated that searches for the Boston boomed by 593 percent in the first-half of the year alone.

Your Highsnobiety privacy settings have blocked this Twitter post.

Imitation accusations aren't new for Nike's Calm family either. When Nike launched its first Calm Slide earlier this year, comparisons were immediately drawn to YEEZY's popular slide, and for good reason too. I mean, they're basically the same identical shoe.

Even so, Nike doesn't seem to care and the impending release of their Birkenstock-ified Calm Mule is proof. As I say, imitation is said to be the best form of flattery. I suppose it's just a case of realizing when said imitation is being taken too far.

We Recommend
  • Nike's Dropping an Elderly Foam Sandal
    • Sneakers
  • Socks & Sandal Go Together Like Peanut Butter & Jelly
    • Style
  • Mules! Yep, Just More Mules
    • Style
  • Jordan Brand's Foa- Er, Roam Clog Is Not a Runner
    • Sneakers
  • The Foam Mule Market Is Booming
    • Sneakers
What To Read Next
  • Fashion's Game of Musical Chairs Heats Up
    • Style
  • Nike's Olympic Basketball Sneaker Is an Instant Collector's Item
    • Sneakers
  • PUMA’s Gloriously Fuzzy Sneaker Is a Work of Art (Literally)
    • Sneakers
  • Kith and Team USA Are The True Dream Team
    • Style
  • Luxury Jewelry’s New Big Three: David Yurman Taps NBA Style Savants For Its Latest Campaign
    • Style
    • sponsored
  • Mizuno's Hand-Dyed Sneaker Is a Feat of Japanese Craftsmanship
    • Sneakers

Web Accessibility Statement

Titel Media GmbH (Highsnobiety), is committed to facilitating and improving the accessibility and usability of its Website, www.highsnobiety.com. Titel Media GmbH strives to ensure that its Website services and content are accessible to persons with disabilities including users of screen reader technology. To accomplish this, Titel Media GmbH tests, remediates and maintains the Website in-line with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), which also bring the Website into conformance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Disclaimer

Please be aware that our efforts to maintain accessibility and usability are ongoing. While we strive to make the Website as accessible as possible some issues can be encountered by different assistive technology as the range of assistive technology is wide and varied.

Contact Us

If, at any time, you have specific questions or concerns about the accessibility of any particular webpage on this Website, please contact us at accessibility@highsnobiety.com, +49 (0)30 235 908 500. If you do encounter an accessibility issue, please be sure to specify the web page and nature of the issue in your email and/or phone call, and we will make all reasonable efforts to make that page or the information contained therein accessible for you.